Scott Harvey Wines

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Jana Harvey
 
October 22, 2018 | Jana Harvey

Visit the Best of Amador County

Rolling hills, rustic charm, and world-class wineries await you in Northern California!

If you haven’t already, enter our Wine Country getaway contest to win a three-night/four-day trip for four in Amador County Wine Country.

Liquid Gold

Once home to Gold Rush prospectors, Amador County is back on the map, this time for its award-winning wines and friendly hospitality.

Winemaking isn’t new to Amador County. Vines were planted in the mid-1800s to satiate the many Europeans that were seeking riches in the area. The volcanic and sandy loam soils are extremely well-suited for creating flavorful and luscious wines. While Prohibition resulted in abandoned vineyard plots, some sites survived due to the resilience of the vines and today are producing spectacular old vine reserve Zinfandel.

In addition to Zinfandel, the local wineries have been successful in producing varieties with Italian, Spanish, and Rhône origins such as Barbera, Aglianico, Tempranillo, Viognier, Grenache, Syrah, and Mourvèdre.

Be Our Guest

The team at Scott Harvey Wines, along with our partners Baja Limo, Taste Restaurant & Wine Bar and FlyWithWine, looks forward to welcoming our sweepstakes winner. Together, we’ve cultivated a handful of VIP food and wine experiences to make your trip a once-in-a-lifetime experience!

The winner and guests will be hosted by winemakers and owners Scott and Jana Harvey at the Scott Harvey Winery in Plymouth... Scott grew up in the Sierra Foothills region and has been involved in winemaking for over 40 years. In 2005, he and his wife Jana–also a wine industry veteran–began making wine under their own labels. They now run two tasting rooms, one in downtown Sutter Creek and the other at their winery in Shenandoah Valley, welcoming thousands of guests for tastings, pairings, tours, and events.

Wine Country Itinerary

The winner will enjoy a long weekend with accommodations in the winery’s estates guest house. We’ll delight them with a guided vineyard tour with Winemaker Scott Harvey, as well as a private dinner with Scott and Jana Harvey. Good company requires great food, and Estate Chef Brian Overhauser will deliver just that. Additionally, Chef Brian will prepare a VIP Food & Wine Pairing experience to showcase our food-friendly, Old World style wines. A special offer to purchase Scott Harvey Wines at the discounted Wine Club member pricing will allow guests to take home memories to be shared long after their trip.

Scott & Jana Harvey

The weekend will continue with a guided winery tour through Amador County’s sun-drenched hills.

Ride in style with Baja Limo, the premier luxury transport service of the Bay Area and Northern California Wine Country. Courtesy of Baja Limo, the group will receive a $250 gift card allowing them to splurge along the way!

Taste Restaurant & Wine Bar, the most flavorful, local favorite, will treat the winner and their guests to a decadent lunch with the freshest, seasonal ingredients.

FlyWithWine will help the winner continue to create fond memories by supplying a gorgeous, durable 12-bottle VinGardeValise® wine suitcase to transport their award-winning Amador wines home to share with family and friends.

Experience a Dream Vacation

With over 40 wineries and tasting rooms and a plethora of wine varietals to taste, we know you will have a unique and unforgettable adventure in Amador County!

Take a moment to enter online: Wine Country getaway. And don’t forget to share with your friends and family!

We hope to welcome you to Amador County Wine Country soon!

 

 

 

Time Posted: Oct 22, 2018 at 9:05 AM
Jana Harvey
 
October 4, 2018 | Jana Harvey

Cooking Video: End-of-Summer Sauvignon Blanc & Your Best Tomatoes

Seasonal changes are a breath of fresh air. Here in Northern California wine country, we ease into the cool, fall weather much later than our Midwest and East Coast friends. But whether it’s still a dry 80 degrees or a balmy 60, Sauvignon Blanc makes for a deliciously drinkable wine all year long – especially when paired with end-of-season tomatoes! Enjoy this delectable dish created by Estate Chef Brian Overhauser. Cheers!

 

Heirloom Tomato Stack Paired with 2017 Jana Winery Sauvignon Blanc, Lake County

This wine-friendly appetizer is nicely balanced by the crisp refreshment of Jana’s 2017 Sauvignon Blanc from Lake County. It provides appropriate fruit and acidity for this rather clean and fresh salad.

Serves 4

  • 6 Heirloom tomatoes approximately the same size
  • 1 Package pre-sliced fresh mozzarella
  • 1 garlic cloves pressed
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon white pepper
  • 1 cup fresh micro basil
  • ½ cup EVOO

Method:

Cut the tomatoes as thin as possible to get 24 pieces and layout in a single layer on a sheet tray lined with parchment paper.

Salt and pepper each peace and then drizzle some EVOO as well. Now, take the cheese and distribute on top of every other tomato. Distribute the garlic evenly on top of all the slices.

Now, stack one at a time to get 4 stacks with six pieces each containing two slices of Mozzarella

To serve:
Transfer the very cold plate and top with micro basil and enjoy with a bottle of 2017 Jana Sauvignon Blanc on a warm, late summer day or by the firepit on an early fall evening.

 

 

Time Posted: Oct 4, 2018 at 10:00 AM
Jana Harvey
 
August 1, 2018 | Jana Harvey

Say Hello to Sekt Series Part 3

Sparkle Through Summer - Say Hello to Sekt Series Part 3

This sparkler was practically made for a summer soiree, with its juicy crush of stone fruit flavors and waves of refreshing minerality coupled with racy acidity. The Jana Blanc de Blanc holds its own during a meal thanks to its complexity and voluptuous body, and complements a variety of cuisines perfectly. To finish out this bubbly blog series, we’re sharing some of our favorite summer dishes to enjoy with our Sekt-style Jana Blanc de Blanc!

Fresh Vietnamese Noodle Salad

Crunchy, fresh, and satisfying, this simple Vietnamese-inspired dish begs for hot summer days and a glass of Jana Blanc de Blanc. The salad brings a hint of acid to complement but not overpower the wine’s pronounced acidity on the palate, and its touch of fiery spice serves as this bubbly’s perfect foil. Grill some chicken or pork to serve on alongside the salad, pop a bottle, and you’ve got yourself a perfect evening, if you ask us.

Easy Moo Shu Pork

Packed with vibrant sweet and savory flavors, this dish is as delicious as it is simple, allowing for maximum time to enjoy the summer evening with a glass (or a few) of Jana Blanc de Blanc. The dish’s straightforward elements delightfully contrast the wine’s intricate mosaic of flavors on the palate.

Grilled Veggie and Meat Skewers

Think seasonal delicacies like eggplant, mushroom, squash, red onion, and bell pepper skewered alongside chicken, pork, you name it! The wine’s crisp flavors and bright texture bring out the same qualities in the vegetables you choose. A sip of Jana Blanc de Blanc after a bite of grilled goodness strikes the perfect gastronomic balance.

So whether you choose to sip your sparkler solo this summer or alongside one of these simple summer specialties, we hope you feel a little extra sparkly!

Time Posted: Aug 1, 2018 at 11:33 AM
Jana Harvey
 
July 24, 2018 | Jana Harvey

Reading Between the Vines

Putting wine into words tends to elude even the most talented philosophers and linguists. Ancient Greek playwright Euripides came close when he said, “Both to the rich and poor, wine is the happy antidote for sorrow.” Centuries later, author Paulo Coelho encourages readers to “accept what life offers you and try to drink from every cup. All wines should be tasted; some should only be sipped, but with others, drink the whole bottle.”


Mosel, Germany

Wine speaks without words, though humans try to translate its language with every sip, every layer of flavor, every year in the cellar. Perhaps what’s most difficult to grasp about wine’s existence is its terroir, which has no direct English translation. (Terroir, in English, combines 5 traits: climate, soil, terrain, vintage, and in some areas with a long history of winemaking, tradition.)

Grapevines grow in some of the most fascinating and geographically treacherous places in the world–whether it’s Riesling rooted inside blue slate on staggering grades in the craggs of German mountain towns or Assyrtiko curled into nests rooted in volcanic ash on the Santorini coast, wine is not just a product of where it came from, it is a time capsule, a bottled poem written by the wind, the rain, the soil, and sun. We carefully craft wines of distinction that tell their story of place, variety, tradition and vintage. Our wine is a true expression of terroir.

Santorini, Greece

A winemaker like Scott Harvey tends to the vines and makes the resulting wine to best express terroir. He is the winemaker, after all. But most European languages don’t even have a word for winemaker–the closest translation equates to “wine grower.” By definition, wine and its terroir transcend the passage of man. Scott Harvey, however, has found a balance between using traditional methods to bring out the best of the grapes’ character and allowing the grapes and the resulting wine to speak for themselves.


With his dynamic background in winemaking beginning with his training in Rheinland Pfalz in Germany, Scott has sharpened his terroir-translating skills with old-world winemakers whose families had been making wine for generations. He approaches his vines and wines through an old world lens, allowing for their bright, California character to shine through the old-world influence of minimal oak and balanced winemaking techniques.

During Scott Harvey experiences, you have the chance to immerse yourself in Amador terroir. Feel the soil beneath your feet on a walk around the vineyards, let the sun’s rays warm your skin, and taste in the winery nestled in the rolling hills and valleys of vines. Listen as the master of the old world himself, Scott Harvey tells you what is happening at that moment in the vineyards and how it affects the wine in your glass. And if you’re a 3&3 wine & food pairing guest or enjoying a vineyard tour with Scott, you’ll taste the wine these very vineyards birthed. So read between the vines–allow terroir to be translated by all of your senses, and discover Scott Harvey.

Time Posted: Jul 24, 2018 at 9:21 AM
Jana Harvey
 
June 19, 2018 | Jana Harvey

Sparkle Through Summer Series: Say Hello to Sekt!

Enter Scott Harvey: Master of Old-World-style Wines in the New World

Scott’s interest in winemaking took hold when he was a high school exchange student in Rheinland Pfalz, Germany. It was there he discovered the artisanal method of not just producing but crafting wines, through a delicate balance of art and science. After college, he returned to Germany to apprentice at K. Fitz-Ritter and simultaneously attend the prestigious Weinbau Schule in Neustadt.

A Study in Sekt

Throughout his studies, Scott found that there were distinct quality differences between the sparkling wines that were made using the tank or transfer methods, and those that were crafted in the traditional method. Greater still, he noticed, the divide between Sekt made with more abundant, affordable varieties like Muller-Thurgau or Silvaner, and those whose base wine was difficult-to-manage, costly Riesling.

The most highly-regarded German Sekts are called Winzersekt and are dry, usually made with estate-grown Riesling grapes. Scott Harvey, now in his fourth decade of winemaking, has perfected the art of old world Sekt in the new world of wine with his Jana Blanc de Blanc.

In his own words:

“I love making and drinking sparkling wine. When Jana and I travel I always throw in a bottle of sparkling wine in to enjoy somewhere along the way. Great on a long hike to a distant mountain peak.

I was trained in the art of making sparkling wine at the third oldest sparkling wine house (K Fitz Ritter Sekt Kellerei) in Germany. That was 45 years ago when we still hand riddled all the bottles. I learned how to produce a dry brut style Riesling Sekt. Ever since then I have been producing ‘Methode Champenoise’ sparkling wines in California. Our current release is 100% Riesling, three years on triage and produced as a high quality brut just like we did at K Fitz Ritter and as it is done in Champagne France.”

—Scott Harvey

The Place

Scott sources the Riesling grapes for the Jana Blanc de Blanc, named for his wife Jana Harvey, from one of the last Riesling vineyards left in Mendocino County, Nelson Ranch. Nestled in an upland side canyon, the 40-year-old vineyard births small, intensely flavorful grapes.

The Wine

After its second fermentation, Scott allows this dry Sekt-style wine to rest en Tirage (on the lees) for three years, creating a deep, complex tessellation of aromas and flavors once the wine hits the glass. Racy yet delicate, the Jana Blanc de Blanc bursts onto the palate with flavors of lychee, brioche, fresh cream, juicy peaches, and apricot blossom, tied together with buoyant acidity, elegant bubbles, and shimmering minerality, which meld into a long, fresh finish. It’s summer’s soulmate, pure freshness in a bottle. The Jana Blanc de Blanc is anything but ordinary. We can't wait for you to pop a bottle this summer, and make your summer extraordinary. 

Time Posted: Jun 19, 2018 at 1:50 PM
Jana Harvey
 
May 31, 2018 | Jana Harvey

Sparkle Through Summer Series: The 3 Methods of Sparkling Winemaking

The three methods of sparkling winemaking

Fizz, pop, clink, sip. This ritual is one bubbly-lovers hold sacred, and many look to Champagne for their fizzy fix. Made with mainly Chardonnay grapes, Blanc de Blancs from Champagne has enjoyed a lifetime of prestige, so much so that many French Champagne houses have grown to be international brands whose wine is made on multiple continents, including our own.

What few realize is that German winemakers have been making sparkling wine, or Sekt, in an off-dry style, using affordable varieties from more economical regions such as Muller-Thurgau. Most producers of the boozy bubbly beverage use the economical Tank Method (like Prosecco). Larger houses (rarely in Germany) produce their bubbly through the slightly more complex transfer method. Less use high-quality and pricey Riesling grapes and lesser still use the labor-intensive and time-consuming traditional method of production. So what exactly are the differences between the three methods of sparkling wine production? In the first of a three-part series, we’ll break down the three most commonly-used means of production.

Photo Credit: Wine Folly

Traditional Method

The Traditional Method of sparkling winemaking goes by many names: Méthode Champenoise, Méthode Traditionelle, Méthode Cap Classique, to name a few. Whatever the alias, the finished products are some of the most celebrated due to the sheer amount of time, labor and money that went into their creation. The most magical part? The entire transformation from still to sparkling wine takes place inside the glass walls of each bottle. 

 

 

Base Wine

First, grapes are picked (usually sooner than grapes used solely for still wines, to preserve acidity) and fermented to dry as usual. The winemaker blends multiple base wines together to create a cuvée (blend).

Tirage

Next, the base wine is bottled and a precise mixture of yeast, wine, and sugar called liqueur de tirage is added to the base wine to each bottle, which are capped with a crown cap (like a beer bottle). This triggers the second fermentation.

Second Fermentation

The second fermentation creates about 1.3% more alcohol and carbon dioxide, and spent yeast cells that remain in the bottle.

Aging

The wine is then left to age on these spent yeast cells, or lees (sur lie, or en tirage) to develop texture, complexity, and autolytic character in the wine. This process is entirely subjective and can be anywhere from 9 months to 5 years, depending on quality. Many believe the longer the wine rests on the lees, the better.

 

 

Riddling

Once the winemaker decides the wine is close to finished, it’s time to Riddle! Riddling traditionally takes place in riddling racks; rectangular wooden boards hinged at the top, both sides with holes to hold the necks of bottles. The bottles are placed neck-down into the racks at a 45-degree angle. Every day for several weeks, the riddler rotates every single bottle a few degrees, gently shifting the lees closer to the neck of the bottle. At the end of the process, the bottles are slanted a 60-degree angle and are completely neck-down in their holes, and all the lees are collected in the neck.

Disgorgement

This process removes sediment from the bottle without wasting wine or compromising quality. After riddling, bottles are placed upside-down into a freezing solution for several minutes which causes the residual yeast particles to freeze. The crown caps are then popped off which allows the frozen plug of lees to shoot out. The minimal amount of wine lost in the process is replaced with a slightly sweet mixture of wine and sugar, or dosage, which balances the acidity in the wine.

Photo Credit: Wine Folly

Transfer Method

The transfer method is identical to the traditional method until the aging process is complete. After aging, the bottled wines are emptied into a large, pressurized tank and filtered immediately to separate the lees from the wine. This method sidesteps the costly and difficult riddling and disgorgement of the traditional method, yet the resulting wines still may have delicious autolytic flavors and textures.

Photo Credit: Wine Folly

Tank Method

Also known as the Charmat Method, the tank method tends to be the fastest and most affordable and uses (you guessed it) a stainless steel tank to turn a still base wine into a sparkling one, rather than a bottle. Finished wine is added together with liqueur de tirage, a sugar, wine, and yeast mixture, triggering a rapid fermentation within the pressure-resistant tank.

As the fermentation goes on, carbon dioxide released from the fermentation causes the tank to pressurize, and the resulting sparkling wine is filtered, dosed with a solution of sugar and wine, and bottled.

Wines made using the tank method are inherently fresher in character as they are not aged at all. Large-volume producers of sparkling wines around the world utilize this method as it allows for the quickest turnaround (approximately 10-12 days from base wine to bottle) of the three methods.

Time Posted: May 31, 2018 at 9:31 AM

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